Glenn McCartney

    Glenn McCartney, Ph.D. is an assistant professor of gaming and hospitality management at the University of Macau. He has been in the gaming and hospitality industry in Macao for more there 13 years and worked as a consultant to the Macao government during its recent casino concession process. McCartney regularly speaks at international tourism and hospitality industry events and is the author of Event Management: An Asian Perspective (McGraw-Hill). He holds a doctorate in tourism marketing and is the British Honorary Consul for Macao.

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    Non-gaming to take backseat a while longer: Scholar

    While Macau has been focusing on boosting its non-gaming offerings, a scholar notes the future of Macau’s economy will still be based on gaming earnings for years to come.  Speaking on the sidelines of the British Business Association of Macau’s business luncheon yesterday, quoted by Macau Daily Times, Philip Xie, dean of the Faculty of […]

    Chinese visitors becoming more astute: report

    Macau’s large visitors numbers does not translate into high numbers of overnight visits “with Chinese visitors having to pass through a few hundred hotels within the Zhuhai region,” said a research report from Prof. Glenn McCartney CEO of Insights Unlimited Consultancy. McCartney notes that the Chinese visitor is “historically and predominantly a day-tripper to Macau”, […]

    Macau residents increasingly negative towards casinos, study finds

    A new study has found an increasing level of negative sentiment towards Macau’s casino industry, which contributes 90 percent of the territory’s gross domestic product. The study by the University of Macau and published this month in Tourism and Hospitality Research was conducted across Macau’s neighbourhoods. Splitting the respondent profile into those who worked and […]

    Macau casino industry lacks sustainable development says academic

    There is an imbalance, limited consensus and lack of sustainable development within Macau’s tourism and casino industry, an academic from Macau University wrote in an analysis published this month. Glenn McCartney, assistant professor in gaming at the University of Macau, whose findings have been published in the international tourism journal Emerald Insight says to reverse […]

    Govt should link concessions to non-gaming: Tourism expert

    Glenn McCartney, professor at the University of Macau says that tourism development should become a key criteria in the upcoming race for gaming concessions in Macau. In an interview with Tribune De Macau, McCartney said he believes that there will be changes in the casino landscape, and that there needs to be a stronger push […]

    ASEAN Gaming Summit releases China Travel Trends Whitepaper

    Despite recent economic turmoil caused by the outbreak of the coronavirus, Chinese outbound tourists are expected to remain as the main-stay market key to Asia integrated resort growth, with Chinese border crossings expected to reach 400 million by 2030. This week, the team at Asia Gaming Brief is pleased to release a whitepaper about the future […]

    Experts to discuss recovery of Chinese tourism

    Following a highly successful first installment of the AGB Webinar Series on April 9th, featuring Earle Hall on “Life After COVID-19”, Asia Gaming Brief is pleased to announce the second AGB Webinar. This time, we take a look at the roadmap to tourism recovery in Asia, particularly with the important Chinese tourism segment. Our panel […]

    Will to travel remains strong once safety policies in place

    Mainland Chinese are still keen to travel despite the Covid-19 pandemic and Macau and Vietnam are likely to be the first destinations to benefit once travel restrictions are lifted and flights resume.

    Tables vs temples: competing for tourists’ attention

    With its pristine, golden beaches and exotic temples, Asia has cemented itself as a premium tourist region, attracting millions of travellers every year. Yet, these same attractions may also be keeping them away from Asia’s integrated resorts, with many tourists no longer drawn by slot machines and gaming tables, instead preferring to spend their hard-earned time and money on non-gaming entertainment options. So how do IRs stay relevant?

    Attracting MICE

    Macau saw a 62 percent spike in MICE visitation in the first quarter, helped by government subsidies, though the territory still faces considerable hurdles to reach its full potential as an events and exhibitions destination. Macau has lost out to regional rivals due to a lack of hotel capacity, limited venues, poor transport links and a branding problem and although problems are gradually being addressed progress is slow.

    Non-gaming revenues rise, but offering fails to inspire

    Chinese Premier Li Keqiang praised Macau’s efforts to diversify its economy during a three-day visit last year, but market experts say operators are still trying to get the recipe right when it comes to non-gaming attractions and face an uphill struggle. Revenue from non-gaming has improved, however, Macau is still far from being a destination that will attract visitors for its tourism offering off the casino floor. 

    Sands serves French flavour to whet mainland tourism appetite

    Ask many mainland Chinese what their dream travel destination is and the answer is unlikely to be Macau. According to a survey by CLSA, Macau came bottom out of a list of 21 destinations, with Europe, the U.S. and Australia topping the list. So, could Sheldon Adelson have hit upon a winning formula with his latest resort -- the $2.8 billion Parisian? The property, like its sister next door, aims to bring a little bit of Europe to the Cotai strip, providing a taste of all things French without the lengthy voyage and language complexities.

    Tourism blueprint is good start but hurdles high

    Macau’s tourism development masterplan, which aims to transform the VIP gaming hub into a mass market, diversified leisure destination, forecasts as many as 40 million tourists a year by 2015. The blueprint contains a clear vision of what the government wants for the future, with tourists staying longer and spending more on non-gaming activities. However, tourism industry experts say Macau as a family destination faces significant headwinds and stakeholders still haven't reached consensus on what brand Macau should be. 

    Going bold on branding

    As regional gambling revenue slumps, some companies are finding a new marketing strategy isn’t enough to draw the crowds and instead are trying for a complete rebrand. Operators such as Star Entertainment, Donaco and Macau junket Tak Chun has all recently tweaked their image. However, rebranding is a complicated and costly process, especially if you get it wrong.

    Macau needs better branding, tourism planning for successful transition

    Macau, whose meteoric success was fueled by the high-spending VIP gambler, needs to improve its branding and tourism planning if it is to transform to a majority non-gaming model and replace income from the missing high rollers. The government is determined to effect a Las Vegas-style shift to a destination resort, but experts say it will be a difficult road. 

    Asia remains first choice for mass, but VIPs venturing further

    It’s difficult to enter a tourist hotspot in Asia without observing signs written in Chinese, or a street vendor shouting greetings in Mandarin - a testament to the influence of Chinese outbound tourism.

    Macau 2020 and beyond

    The 1999 handover and casino liberalization policy put in place a new phase of development for Macau. All six casino licenses are soon set to expire and once the retendering process has been enacted, Macau will enter a crucial next phase. 

    Twenty years of Macau’s unplanned miracle

    Six gaming companies have transformed a sleepy colonial outpost into one of the richest cities in the world. But despite the vast wealth, infrastructure and social policies are still lagging.
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