Rashid Suliman: Reflecting on the last 20 years of Macau gaming

Rashid Suliman

VP – Global Gaming Asia-Pacific, Transact Technologies

When did you arrive in Macau and in what capacity?

My first trip to Macau was back in early 2006 for a project at Wynn Macau when I was with Orion Art. In August 2011, I joined Transact Technologies and shortly after relocated to Macau with my family from Sydney.

What were your first impressions?

I developed a keen sense of wanderlust at a young age when I moved from South Africa to Australia as a child. As such, I really looked forward to visiting this captivating city. When I first arrived, I was fascinated with the East meets West culture. It was initially a culture shock, but I quickly grew to love this city, and I’m proud to say this has become the place that my family and I now call home. Seeing the landscape of Macau change so quickly right before my eyes, I never expected it would become what it is today and I’m excited to see how it will continue to evolve.

What are the biggest changes you have seen in your section of the industry?

Technology has come a long way in the last decade, and that is evident when you look around the properties and gaming floors. In addition, what’s taking place behind the scenes in both hardware and software technology advancements is creating a more dynamic and enjoyable user experience. Customer experience and loyalty are paramount.

What have you found most challenging or memorable?

Logistics (taxis in particular) were certainly what I found to be the most challenging, and I’d have to say the friendships we’ve made throughout this journey to be the most memorable by far. The gaming industry is large but pretty tight-knit at the same time. I appreciate all the customers and business contacts I have made thus far.

Share a curious/ funny episode that could only have happened in Macau?

T.I.M (This is Macau) was the phrase used on many occasions in my early days of Macau to depict situations that seemed to have no rhyme or reason. A series of books could be written about these and other amusing events which have taken place over these years.

How are you expecting Macau to evolve in the next 20 years?

I think technology will play a key part in this constantly evolving landscape, and we will see more attractions for families and non-gaming visitors to Macau and Henqin Island. I also expect it to be easier to get in and around Macau saving time and creating a more overall enjoyable experience.