Mainland China

Mainland Chinese police have busted an illegal casino in China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, arresting 104 gamblers, and seizing 535 gambling devices.

Authorities in China have launched a campaign to crack down on gambling in rural areas ahead of the Lunar New Year holidays.

Lottery service provider AGTech announced on Monday it has won the bid to market and promote instant scratch sports lottery in the country from the PRC National Sports Lottery Centre.

The Chinese island of Hainan may become a new hub for land-based casinos, with government agencies reportedly considering allowing online betting and other gambling on the island.

Chinese outbound investors can expect to see more regulatory scrutiny when it comes to "sensitive countries and regions" or "sensitive industries".

China’s welfare lottery sales increased 5.1 percent year-on-year in 2017, reaching RMB 217 billion (US$33 billion).

The number of trips made abroad by mainland Chinese residents is estimated to be more than 60 million in 2017, according to the Foreign Ministry.

China appears to have renewed its ban on travel groups to South Korea, dealing a further blow to the country’s tourism industry.

In just under two decades, virtual sports have gone from being a niche vertical dismissed by many as cartoon betting, to one of the fastest growing areas in gaming, with operators in Asia increasingly taking notice.

In just under two decades, virtual sports have gone from being a niche vertical dismissed by many as cartoon betting, to one of the fastest growing areas in gaming, with operators in Asia increasingly taking notice. Interest is undoubtedly strong amongst Asia's sports mad punters, however, slow turning wheels of regulation, or lack of rules, is holding back progress.



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Even by the standards of initial coin offerings (ICOs), Macau gaming company Dragon Corp. raised eyebrows in September with an announcement that it planned to raise $500 million to build a floating casino that operates in a newly-created cryptocurrency. 

 

Even by the standards of initial coin offerings (ICOs), Macau gaming company Dragon Corp. raised eyebrows in September with an announcement that it planned to raise $500 million to build a floating casino that operates in a newly-created cryptocurrency. Its aim is to undercut Macau's massive junket industry that finances high rollers in the gambling hub. However, the company's ambitious plans face major regulatory hurdles.

 



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