Mainland China

The continuous political climate in China could curb many casino resorts’ marketing efforts and focus on the VIP segment, especially the direct VIP channel.

Looking forward to 2017, the picture is less than clear. With the recent detention and arrests of Crown’s staff in China, all but one of the operators in Macau have ceased their direct marketing efforts across the border.

Casino operators have been slowly ramping back up marketing activity in China after pulling out last year in fear of further repercussions from Crown’s crackdown.

Payment systems provider Paysafe saw its shares tumble on Tuesday after a short-selling firm Spotlight Research claimed it was enabling illegal gambling and Chinese capital control evasion.

A prominent Chinese law firm has urged Crown Resorts to issue a confession to Chinese authorities in order to improve the situation for its detained employees.

Authorities in central China have rounded up 94 members of a $72 billion gambling ring, which was known for bringing Chinese gamblers across to parts of Southeast Asia.

China’s lottery sales rose 8.3 percent year-on-year to CNY 33.8 billion (US$4.9 billion) in October, according to the Ministry of Finance.

More than 100 million mainland Chinese travellers made outbound trips in the first nine months of 2016, according to travel data from COTRI.

The chairman of a major casino junket operator in Macau has slammed the behavior of Crown Resorts in mainland China, saying it has been “too aggressive” in marketing its Australian properties to VIP gamblers.

The 16 Crown Resort employees placed under detention in China last month have now been formally arrested, which could see them spend at least the next six months in custody.

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